Andy Murray reveals Covid scare ahead of Australian Open – ‘I was really sick’

Andy Murray practices ahead of Australian Open

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Andy Murray has revealed that he had a Covid-scare after being “really sick” following his appearance at the Mubadala World Tennis Championship last month. Multiple players, including Murray’s opponents Rafael Nadal and Andrey Rublev, tested positive following the Abu Dhabi exhibition, as well as his coach. The former world No 1 was forced out of the Australian Open last year after testing positive, but said his illness in December “wasn’t Covid-related”.

Murray is set to play the Australian Open for the first time since 2019, when he tearfully admitted in a pre-tournament press conference it would likely be the last event of his career after battling an ongoing hip injury.

The current world No 135, who underwent a hip resurfacing surgery shortly after the Australian Open three years ago, was forced out of the season-opening Grand Slam last year after testing positive for Covid and being unable to find a workable quarantine period.

After losing his opening-round match at last week’s Melbourne Summer Set, Murray scored his first win on Australian soil since January 1 2019 on Tuesday, defeating qualifier Viktor Durasovic 6-3 6-1 at the Sydney Tennis Classic.

Following his victory, the three-time Major champion admitted he’d had a Covid scare in the lead-up to the Australian Open, and shared his “nerves” about catching the virus after arriving Down Under.

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The 34-year-old competed in the Mubadala World Tennis Championship last month, making it to the final after defeating Dan Evans and Rafael Nadal, then losing to Andrey Rublev.

Following the Abu Dhabi exhibition, multiple players including Nadal, Rublev, Denis Shapovalov, Belinda Bencic and Ons Jabeur all tested positive for Covid, while Emma Raducanu returned a positive test ahead of the event, forcing her to withdraw.

Murray’s coach Jan de Witt and Nadal’s coach Carlos Moya were also among those to test positive, as the former world No 1 then admitted he thought he would catch the virus ahead of the Australian Open.

“I was obviouslyexpecting that I was going to get it when all of thepositive cases happened, and then obviously when mycoach got it, as well, I was expecting it,” Murray told reporters following his victory in Sydney.

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Murray revealed he had a Covid scare after the exhibition, getting “really sick” when other players were testing positive.

He continued: “I actually got really sick. I didn’t play or train for 10 days after Abu Dhabi.

“Yeah, it wasn’t COVID-related. I had a really bad cold, and my children had it and wife and mother-in-law. Like, everyone in our house got it, and I was, yeah, really quite ill.”

The five-time Australian Open finalist also admitted he was more worried about catching Covid after arriving in Australia compared to if he had caught it after Abu Dhabi like his fellow players.

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